Togaf® version 9.1 / The Open Group.

By: The Open GroupMaterial type: TextTextSeries: Publisher: Zaltbommel (Holanda) : Van haren Publishing, 2011Description: xl, 654 p. : il. ; 23 cmISBN: 9789087536794; 9087536798Subject(s): TOGAF | SOFTWARE DE CODIGO ABIERTO | ARQUITECTURA DE COMPUTADORESDDC classification: 004.22
Contents:
Frontmatter Preface This Document Intended Audience Keywords About The Open Group Participants Architecture Forum Technical Reviewers Architecture Forum Members Trademarks Acknowledgements Referenced Documents 1. Introduction 1.1 Structure of the TOGAF Document 1.2 Executive Overview What is an enterprise? Why do I need an enterprise architecture? What specifically would prompt me to develop an enterprise architecture? What is an architecture framework? Why do I need TOGAF as a framework for enterprise architecture? Who would benefit from using TOGAF? 2. Core Concepts 2.1 What is TOGAF? 2.2 What is Architecture in the Context of TOGAF? 2.3 What Kind of Architecture Does TOGAF Deal With? 2.4 Architecture Development Method 2.5 Deliverables, Artifacts, and Building Blocks 2.6 Enterprise Continuum 2.7 Architecture Repository 2.8 Establishing and Maintaining an Enterprise Architecture Capability 2.9 Establishing the Architecture Capability as an Operational Entity 2.10 Using TOGAF with Other Frameworks 3. Definitions 3.1 Abstraction 3.2 Actor 3.3 Application 3.4 Application Architecture 3.5 Application Platform 3.6 Application Platform Interface (API) 3.7 Architectural Style 3.8 Architecture 3.9 Architecture Building Block (ABB) 3.10 Architecture Continuum 3.11 Architecture Development Method (ADM) 3.12 Architecture Domain 3.13 Architecture Framework 3.14 Architecture Governance 3.15 Architecture Landscape 3.16 Architecture Principles 3.17 Architecture Vision 3.18 Artifact 3.19 Baseline 3.20 Boundaryless Information Flow 3.21 Building Block 3.22 Business Architecture 3.23 Business Function 3.24 Business Governance 3.25 Business Service 3.26 Capability 3.27 Capability Architecture 3.28 Capability Increment 3.29 Communications and Stakeholder Management 3.30 Concerns 3.31 Constraint 3.32 Data Architecture 3.33 Deliverable 3.34 Enterprise 3.35 Enterprise Continuum 3.36 Foundation Architecture 3.37 Framework 3.38 Gap 3.39 Governance 3.40 Information 3.41 Information Technology (IT) 3.42 Interoperability 3.43 Logical 3.44 Metadata 3.45 Metamodel 3.46 Method 3.47 Methodology 3.48 Model 3.49 Modeling 3.50 Objective 3.51 Patterns 3.52 Performance Management 3.53 Physical 3.54 Platform 3.55 Platform Service 3.56 Principle 3.57 Reference Model (RM) 3.58 Repository 3.59 Requirement 3.60 Roadmap 3.61 Role 3.62 Segment Architecture 3.63 Service Orientation 3.64 Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) 3.65 Solution Architecture 3.66 Solution Building Block (SBB) 3.67 Solutions Continuum 3.68 Stakeholder 3.69 Standards Information Base (SIB) 3.70 Strategic Architecture 3.71 Target Architecture 3.72 Taxonomy of Architecture Views 3.73 Technology Architecture 3.74 Transition Architecture 3.75 View 3.76 Viewpoint 3.77 Work Package 4. Release Notes 4.1 What's New in TOGAF 9? Modular Structure Content Framework Extended Guidance on Adopting TOGAF within an Enterprise Explicit Consideration of Architectural Styles, Including SOA and Security Architecture Additional ADM Detail 4.1.1 Changes Applied in this Edition 4.2 The Benefits of TOGAF 9 Greater Usability More Focus on Holistic Enterprise Change More Consistency of Output 4.3 Mapping of the TOGAF 8.1.1 Structure to TOGAF 9 Part I: Introduction Part II: Architecture Development Method Part III: Enterprise Continuum Part IV: Resource Base 4.4 Mapping of TOGAF 9 Structure to TOGAF 8.1.1 4.5 Using TOGAF 4.5.1 Conditions of Use 4.5.2 How Much Does TOGAF Cost? 4.5.3 Downloads 4.6 Why Join The Open Group? 5. Introduction 5.1 ADM Overview 5.1.1 The ADM, Enterprise Continuum, and Architecture Repository 5.1.2 The ADM and the Foundation Architecture 5.1.3 ADM and Supporting Guidelines and Techniques 5.2 Architecture Development Cycle 5.2.1 Key Points 5.2.2 Basic Structure 5.3 Adapting the ADM 5.4 Architecture Governance 5.5 Scoping the Architecture 5.5.1 Breadth 5.5.2 Depth 5.5.3 Time Period 5.5.4 Architecture Domains 5.6 Architecture Integration 5.7 Summary 6. Preliminary Phase 6.1 Objectives 6.2 Approach 6.2.1 Enterprise 6.2.2 Organizational Context 6.2.3 Requirements for Architecture Work 6.2.4 Principles 6.2.5 Management Frameworks 6.2.6 Relating the Management Frameworks 6.2.7 Planning for Enterprise Architecture/Business Change Maturity Evaluation 6.3 Inputs 6.3.1 Reference Materials External to the Enterprise 6.3.2 Non-Architectural Inputs 6.3.3 Architectural Inputs 6.4 Steps 6.4.1 Scope the Enterprise Organizations Impacted 6.4.2 Confirm Governance and Support Frameworks 6.4.3 Define and Establish Enterprise Architecture Team and Organization 6.4.4 Identify and Establish Architecture Principles 6.4.5 Tailor TOGAF and, if any, Other Selected Architecture Framework(s) 6.4.6 Implement Architecture Tools 6.5 Outputs 7. Phase A: Architecture Vision 7.1 Objectives 7.2 Approach 7.2.1 General 7.2.2 Creating the Architecture Vision 7.2.3 Business Scenarios 7.3 Inputs 7.3.1 Reference Materials External to the Enterprise 7.3.2 Non-Architectural Inputs 7.3.3 Architectural Inputs 7.4 Steps 7.4.1 Establish the Architecture Project 7.4.2 Identify Stakeholders, Concerns, and Business Requirements 7.4.3 Confirm and Elaborate Business Goals, Business Drivers, and Constraints 7.4.4 Evaluate Business Capabilities 7.4.5 Assess Readiness for Business Transformation 7.4.6 Define Scope 7.4.7 Confirm and Elaborate Architecture Principles, including Business Principles 7.4.8 Develop Architecture Vision 7.4.9 Define the Target Architecture Value Propositions and KPIs 7.4.10 Identify the Business Transformation Risks and Mitigation Activities 7.4.11 Develop Statement of Architecture Work; Secure Approval 7.5 Outputs 8. Phase B: Business Architecture 8.1 Objectives 8.2 Approach 8.2.1 General 8.2.2 Developing the Baseline Description 8.2.3 Business Modeling 8.2.4 Architecture Repository 8.3 Inputs 8.3.1 Reference Materials External to the Enterprise 8.3.2 Non-Architectural Inputs 8.3.3 Architectural Inputs 8.4 Steps 8.4.1 Select Reference Models, Viewpoints, and Tools 8.4.1.1 Determine Overall Modeling Process 8.4.1.2 Identify Required Service Granularity Level, Boundaries, and Contracts 8.4.1.3 Identify Required Catalogs of Business Building Blocks 8.4.1.4 Identify Required Matrices 8.4.1.5 Identify Required Diagrams 8.4.1.6 Identify Types of Requirement to be Collected 8.4.2 Develop Baseline Business Architecture Description 8.4.3 Develop Target Business Architecture Description 8.4.4 Perform Gap Analysis 8.4.5 Define Candidate Roadmap Components 8.4.6 Resolve Impacts Across the Architecture Landscape 8.4.7 Conduct Formal Stakeholder Review 8.4.8 Finalize the Business Architecture 8.4.9 Create Architecture Definition Document 8.5 Outputs 9. Phase C: Information Systems Architectures 9.1 Objectives 9.2 Approach 9.3 Inputs 9.3.1 Reference Materials External to the Enterprise 9.3.2 Non-Architectural Inputs 9.3.3 Architectural Inputs 9.4 Steps 9.5 Outputs 10. Phase C: Information Systems Architectures - Data Architecture 10.1 Objectives 10.2 Approach 10.2.1 Key Considerations for Data Architecture 10.2.1.1 Data Management 10.2.1.2 Data Migration 10.2.1.3 Data Governance 10.2.2 Architecture Repository 10.3 Inputs 10.3.1 Reference Materials External to the Enterprise 10.3.2 Non-Architectural Inputs 10.3.3 Architectural Inputs 10.4 Steps 10.4.1 Select Reference Models, Viewpoints, and Tools 10.4.1.1 Determine Overall Modeling Process 10.4.1.2 Identify Required Catalogs of Data Building Blocks 10.4.1.3 Identify Required Matrices 10.4.1.4 Identify Required Diagrams 10.4.1.5 Identify Types of Requirement to be Collected 10.4.2 Develop Baseline Data Architecture Description 10.4.3 Develop Target Data Architecture Description 10.4.4 Perform Gap Analysis 10.4.5 Define Candidate Roadmap Components 10.4.6 Resolve Impacts Across the Architecture Landscape 10.4.7 Conduct Formal Stakeholder Review 10.4.8 Finalize the Data Architecture 10.4.9 Create Architecture Definition Document 10.5 Outputs 11. Phase C: Information Systems Architectures - Application Architecture 11.1 Objectives 11.2 Approach 11.2.1 Architecture Repository 11.3 Inputs 11.3.1 Reference Materials External to the Enterprise 11.3.2 Non-Architectural Inputs 11.3.3 Architectural Inputs 11.4 Steps 11.4.1 Select Reference Models, Viewpoints, and Tools 11.4.1.1 Determine Overall Modeling Process 11.4.1.2 Identify Required Catalogs of Application Building Blocks 11.4.1.3 Identify Required Matrices 11.4.1.4 Identify Required Diagrams 11.4.1.5 Identify Types of Requirement to be Collected 11.4.2 Develop Baseline Application Architecture Description 11.4.3 Develop Target Application Architecture Description 11.4.4 Perform Gap Analysis 11.4.5 Define Candidate Roadmap Components 11.4.6 Resolve Impacts Across the Architecture Landscape 11.4.7 Conduct Formal Stakeholder Review 11.4.8 Finalize the Application Architecture 11.4.9 Create Architecture Definition Document 11.5 Outputs 12. Phase D: Technology Architecture 12.1 Objectives 12.2 Approach 12.2.1 Architecture Repository 12.3 Inputs 12.3.1 Reference Materials External to the Enterprise 12.3.2 Non-Architectural Inputs 12.3.3 Architectural Inputs 12.4 Steps 12.4.1 Select Reference Models, Viewpoints, and Tools 12.4.1.1 Determine Overall Modeling Process 12.4.1.2 Identify Required Catalogs of Technology Building Blocks 12.4.1.3 Identify Required Matrices 12.4.1.4 Identify Required Diagrams 12.4.1.5 Identify Types of Requirement to be Collected 12.4.1.6 Select Services 12.4.2 Develop Baseline Technology Architecture Description 12.4.3 Develop Target Technology Architecture Description 12.4.4 Perform Gap Analysis 12.4.5 Define Candidate Roadmap Components 12.4.6 Resolve Impacts Across the Architecture Landscape 12.4.7 Conduct Formal Stakeholder Review 12.4.8 Finalize the Technology Architecture 12.4.9 Create Architecture Definition Document 12.5 Outputs 12.6 Postscript 13. Phase E: Opportunities & Solutions 13.1 Objectives 13.2 Approach 13.3 Inputs 13.3.1 Reference Materials External to the Enterprise 13.3.2 Non-Architectural Inputs 13.3.3 Architectural Inputs 13.4 Steps 13.4.1 Determine/Confirm Key Corporate Change Attributes 13.4.2 Determine Business Constraints for Implementation 13.4.3 Review and Consolidate Gap Analysis Results from Phases B to D 13.4.4 Review Consolidated Requirements Across Related Business Functions 13.4.5 Consolidate and Reconcile Interoperability Requirements 13.4.6 Refine and Validate Dependencies 13.4.7 Confirm Readiness and Risk for Business Transformation 13.4.8 Formulate Implementation and Migration Strategy 13.4.9 Identify and Group Major Work Packages 13.4.10 Identify Transition Architectures 13.4.11 Create the Architecture Roadmap & Implementation and Migration Plan 13.5 Outputs 14. Phase F: Migration Planning 14.1 Objectives 14.2 Approach 14.3 Inputs 14.3.1 Reference Materials External to the Enterprise 14.3.2 Non-Architectural Inputs 14.3.3 Architectural Inputs 14.4 Steps 14.4.1 Confirm Management Framework Interactions for the Implementation and Migration Plan 14.4.2 Assign a Business Value to Each Work Package 14.4.3 Estimate Resource Requirements, Project Timings, and Availability/Delivery Vehicle 14.4.4 Prioritize the Migration Projects through the Conduct of a Cost/Benefit Assessment and Risk Validation 14.4.5 Confirm Architecture Roadmap and Update Architecture Definition Document 14.4.6 Generate the Implementation and Migration Plan 14.4.7 Complete the Architecture Development Cycle and Document Lessons Learned 14.5 Outputs 15. Phase G: Implementation Governance 15.1 Objectives 15.2 Approach 15.3 Inputs 15.3.1 Reference Materials External to the Enterprise 15.3.2 Non-Architectural Inputs 15.3.3 Architectural Inputs 15.4 Steps 15.4.1 Confirm Scope and Priorities for Deployment with Development Management 15.4.2 Identify Deployment Resources and Skills 15.4.3 Guide Development of Solutions Deployment 15.4.4 Perform Enterprise Architecture Compliance Reviews 15.4.5 Implement Business and IT Operations 15.4.6 Perform Post-Implementation Review and Close the Implementation 15.5 Outputs 16. Phase H: Architecture Change Management 16.1 Objectives 16.2 Approach 16.2.1 Drivers for Change 16.2.2 Enterprise Architecture Change Management Process 16.2.3 Guidelines for Maintenance versus Architecture Redesign 16.3 Inputs 16.3.1 Reference Materials External to the Enterprise 16.3.2 Non-Architectural Inputs 16.3.3 Architectural Inputs 16.4 Steps 16.4.1 Establish Value Realization Process 16.4.2 Deploy Monitoring Tools 16.4.3 Manage Risks 16.4.4 Provide Analysis for Architecture Change Management 16.4.5 Develop Change Requirements to Meet Performance Targets 16.4.6 Manage Governance Process 16.4.7 Activate the Process to Implement Change 16.5 Outputs 17. ADM Architecture Requirements Management 17.1 Objectives 17.2 Approach 17.2.1 General 17.2.2 Requirements Development 17.2.3 Resources 17.2.3.1 Business Scenarios 17.2.3.2 Requirements Tools 17.3 Inputs 17.4 Steps 17.5 Outputs 18. Introduction 18.1 Guidelines for Adapting the ADM Process 18.2 Techniques for Architecture Development 18.3 Using TOGAF with Different Architectural Styles 19. Applying Iteration to the ADM 19.1 Overview 19.2 Iteration Cycles 19.3 Classes of Architecture Engagement 19.4 Approaches to Architecture Development 19.5 Iteration Considerations 19.5.1 Iteration between ADM Cycles 19.5.2 Iteration within an ADM Cycle 19.6 Conclusions Footnotes 20. Applying the ADM across the Architecture Landscape 20.1 Overview 20.2 Architecture Landscape 20.3 Organizing the Architecture Landscape to Understand the State of the Enterprise 20.4 Developing Architectures at Different Levels 21. Security Architecture and the ADM 21.1 Overview 21.2 Introduction 21.3 Guidance on Security for the Architecture Domains 21.4 ADM Architecture Requirements Management Is our security good? Nothing useful can be said about a security measure outside the context of an application, or a system and its environment 21.5 Preliminary Phase Scope the enterprise organizations impacted by the security architecture Define and document applicable regulatory and security policy requirements Define the required security capability as part of Architecture Capability Implement security architecture tools 21.5.1 Security Inputs 21.5.2 Security Outputs 21.6 Phase A: Architecture Vision Obtain management support for security measures Define necessary security-related management sign-off milestones of this architecture development cycle Determine and document applicable disaster recovery or business continuity plans/requirements Identify and document the anticipated physical/business/regulatory environment(s) in which the system(s) will be deployed Determine and document the criticality of the system: safety-critical/mission-critical/non-critical 21.6.1 Security Inputs 21.6.2 Security Outputs 21.7 Phase B: Business Architecture Determine who are the legitimate actors who will interact with the product/service/process Assess and baseline current security-specific business processes (enhancement of existing objective) Determine whom/how much it is acceptable to inconvenience in utilizing security measures Identify and document interconnecting systems beyond project control Determine the assets at risk if something goes wrong - "What are we trying to protect?" Determine the cost (both qualitative and quantitative) of asset loss/impact in failure cases Identify and document the ownership of assets Determine and document appropriate security forensic processes Identify the criticality of the availability and correct operation of the overall service Determine and document how much security (cost) is justified by the threats and the value of the assets at risk Reassess and confirm Architecture Vision decisions Assess alignment or conflict of identified security policies with business goals Determine "what can go wrong?" 21.7.1 Security Inputs 21.7.2 Security Outputs 21.8 Phase C: Information Systems Architectures Assess and baseline current security-specific architecture elements (enhancement of existing objective) Identify safe default actions and failure states Identify and evaluate applicable recognized guidelines and standards Revisit assumptions regarding interconnecting systems beyond project control Determine and document the sensitivity or classification level of information stored/created/used Identify and document custody of assets Identify the criticality of the availability and correct operation of each function Determine the relationship of the system under design with existing business disaster/continuity plans Identify what aspects of the system must be configurable to reflect changes in policy/business environment/access control Identify lifespan of information used as defined by business needs and regulatory requirements Determine approaches to address identified risks: Identify actions/events that warrant logging for later review or triggering forensic processes Identify and document requirements for rigor in proving accuracy of logged events (non-repudiation) Identify potential/likely avenues of attack Determine "what can go wrong?" 21.8.1 Security Inputs 21.8.2 Security Outputs 21.9 Phase D: Technology Architecture Assess and baseline current security-specific technologies (enhancement of existing objective) Revisit assumptions regarding interconnecting systems beyond project control Identify and evaluate applicable recognized guidelines and standards Identify methods to regulate consumption of resources Engineer a method by which the efficacy of security measures will be measured and communicated on an ongoing basis Identify the trust (clearance) level of: Identify minimal privileges required for any entity to achieve a technical or business objective Identify mitigating security measures, where justified by risk assessment Determine "what can go wrong?" 21.9.1 Security Inputs 21.9.2 Security Outputs 21.10 Phase E: Opportunities & Solutions Identify existing security services available for re-use Engineer mitigation measures addressing identified risks Evaluate tested and re-usable security software and security system resources Identify new code/resources/assets that are appropriate for re-use Determine "what can go wrong?" 21.11 Phase F: Migration Planning Assess the impact of new security measures upon other new components or existing leveraged systems Implement assurance methods by which the efficacy of security measures will be measured and communicated on an ongoing basis Identify correct secure installation parameters, initial conditions, and configurations Implement disaster recovery and business continuity plans or modifications Determine "what can go wrong?" 21.12 Phase G: Implementation Governance Establish architecture artifact, design, and code reviews and define acceptance criteria for the successful implementation of the findings Implement methods and procedures to review evidence produced by the system that reflects operational stability and adherence to security policies Implement necessary training to ensure correct deployment, configuration, and operations of security-relevant subsystems and components; ensure awareness training of all users and non-privileged operators of the system and/or its components Determine "what has gone wrong?" 21.13 Phase H: Architecture Change Management Determine "what has gone wrong?" Incorporate security-relevant changes to the environment into the requirements for future enhancement (enhancement of existing objective) 21.14 References 22. Using TOGAF to Define & Govern SOAs 22.1 Overview 22.2 Introduction 22.3 SOA Definition 22.4 SOA Features 22.5 Enterprise Architecture and SOA 22.6 SOA and Levels 22.6.1 Level of Detail of Implementation Specification 22.6.2 SOA Activities at Different Levels 22.7 Using TOGAF for SOA 22.7.1 Preliminary Phase 22.7.1.1 Principle of Service-Orientation 22.7.1.2 Governance and Support Strategy 22.7.1.3 Partitions and Centers of Excellence 22.7.1.4 Architecture Repository 22.7.2 Phase A: Architecture Vision 22.7.2.1 Stakeholders, Concerns, and Business Requirements 22.7.3 Architecture Development: Phases B, C, and D Phase B: Business Architecture Phase C: Information Systems Architectures SOA-Specific Phase C Artifacts Phase D: Technology Architecture SOA-Specific Phase D Artifacts Phase E: Opportunities and Solutions SOA-Specific Phase E Artifacts Phase F: Migration Planning Phase G: Implementation Governance Phase H: Architecture Change Management 22.8 Summary 23. Architecture Principles 23.1 Introduction 23.2 Characteristics of Architecture Principles 23.3 Components of Architecture Principles 23.4 Developing Architecture Principles 23.4.1 Qualities of Principles 23.5 Applying Architecture Principles 23.6 Example Set of Architecture Principles 23.6.1 Business Principles Principle 1: Primary of Principles Principle 2: Maximize Benefit to the Enterprise Principle 3: Information Management is Everybody's Business Principle 4: Business Continuity Principle 5: Common Use Applications Principle 6: Service Orientation Principle 7: Compliance with Law Principle 8: IT Responsibility Principle 9: Protection of Intellectual Property 23.6.2 Data Principles Principle 10: Data is an Asset Principle 11: Data is Shared Principle 12: Data is Accessible Principle 13: Data Trustee Principle 14: Common Vocabulary and Data Definitions Principle 15: Data Security 23.6.3 Application Principles Principle 16: Technology Independence Principle 17: Ease-of-Use 23.6.4 Technology Principles Principle 18: Requirements-Based Change Principle 19: Responsive Change Management Principle 20: Control Technical Diversity Principle 21: Interoperability 24. Stakeholder Management 24.1 Introduction 24.2 Approach to Stakeholder Management 24.3 Steps in the Stakeholder Management Process 24.3.1 Identify Stakeholders 24.3.1.1 Sample Stakeholder Analysis 24.3.2 Classify Stakeholder Positions 24.3.3 Determine Stakeholder Management Approach 24.3.4 Tailor Engagement Deliverables 24.4 Template Stakeholder Map 25. Architecture Patterns 25.1 Introduction 25.1.1 Background 25.1.2 Content of a Pattern 25.1.3 Terminology 25.1.3.1 Architecture Patterns and Design Patterns 25.1.3.2 Patterns and the Architecture Continuum 25.1.3.3 Patterns and Views 25.1.3.4 Patterns and Business Scenarios 25.1.4 Architecture Patterns in Use 25.2 US Treasury Architecture Development Guidance (TADG) 25.2.1 TADG Pattern Content 25.2.2 TADG Architecture Patterns 25.3 IBM Patterns for e-Business 25.4 Some Pattern Resources 26. Business Scenarios and Business Goals 26.1 Introduction 26.2 Benefits of Business Scenarios 26.3 Creating the Business Scenario 26.3.1 Overall Process 26.3.2 Gathering 26.3.3 Analyzing 26.3.4 Reviewing 26.4 Contents of a Business Scenario 26.5 Contributions to the Business Scenario 26.6 Business Scenarios and the TOGAF ADM 26.7 Developing Business Scenarios 26.7.1 General Guidelines 26.7.2 Questions to Ask for Each Area Identifying, Documenting, and Ranking the Problem Identifying the Business & Technical Environment, and Documenting in Models Identifying and Documenting Objectives Identifying Human Actors and their Place in the Business Model Identifying Computer Actors and their Place in the Technology Model Documenting Roles, Responsibilities, Measures of Success, Required Scripts Checking for Fitness-for-Purpose, and refining if necessary 26.8 Business Scenario Documentation 26.8.1 Textual Documentation 26.8.2 Business Scenario Models 26.9 Guidelines on Goals and Objectives 26.9.1 Importance of Goals 26.9.2 Importance of SMART Objectives Example of Making Objectives SMART 26.9.3 Categories of Goals and Objectives Goal: Improve Business Process Performance Goal: Decrease Costs Goal: Improve Business Operations Goal: Improve Management Efficacy Goal: Reduce Risk Goal: Improve Effectiveness of IT Organization Goal: Improve User Productivity Goal: Improve Portability and Scalability Goal: Improve Interoperability Goal: Increase Vendor Independence Goal: Reduce Lifecycle Costs Goal: Improve Security Goal: Improve Manageability 26.10 Summary 27. Gap Analysis 27.1 Introduction 27.2 Suggested Steps 27.3 Example 28. Migration Planning Techniques 28.1 Implementation Factor Assessment & Deduction Matrix 28.2 Consolidated Gaps, Solutions, & Dependencies Matrix 28.3 Architecture Definition Increments Table 28.4 Transition Architecture State Evolution Table 28.5 Business Value Assessment Technique 29. Interoperability Requirements 29.1 Overview 29.2 Defining Interoperability 29.3 Enterprise Operating Model 29.4 Refining Interoperability 29.5 Determining Interoperability Requirements 29.6 Reconciling Interoperability Requirements with Potential Solutions 29.7 Summary Footnotes 30. Business Transformation Readiness Assessment 30.1 Introduction 30.1.1 Business Transformation Enablement Program (BTEP) 30.2 Determine Readiness Factors 30.3 Present Readiness Factors 30.4 Assess Readiness Factors 30.4.1 Readiness Factor Vision 30.4.2 Readiness Factor Rating 30.4.3 Readiness Factor Risks & Actions 30.5 Readiness and Migration Planning 30.6 Marketing the Implementation Plan 30.7 Conclusion Footnotes 31. Risk Management 31.1 Introduction 31.2 Risk Classification 31.3 Risk Identification 31.4 Initial Risk Assessment 31.5 Risk Mitigation and Residual Risk Assessment 31.6 Conduct Residual Risk Assessment 31.7 Risk Monitoring and Governance (Phase G) 31.8 Summary 32. Capability-Based Planning 32.1 Overview 32.2 Capability-Based Planning Paradigm 32.3 Concept of Capability-Based Planning 32.3.1 Capability Dimensions 32.3.2 Capability Increments 32.4 Capabilities in an Enterprise Architecture Context 32.5 Summary 33. Introduction 33.1 Overview 33.2 Content Metamodel 33.3 Content Framework and the TOGAF ADM 33.4 Structure of Part IV 34. Content Metamodel 34.1 Overview 34.2 Content Metamodel Vision and Concepts 34.2.1 Core Content Metamodel Concepts Core and Extension Content Core Metamodel Entities Catalog, Matrix, and Diagram Concept 34.2.2 Overview of the Content Metamodel 34.3 Content Metamodel in Detail 34.3.1 Core Content Metamodel 34.3.2 Core Architecture Artifacts 34.3.3 Full Content Metamodel 34.4 Content Metamodel Extensions 34.4.1 Governance Extensions Purpose Required Changes to the Metamodel 34.4.2 Services Extensions Purpose Required Changes to the Metamodel 34.4.3 Process Modeling Extensions Purpose Required Changes to the Metamodel 34.4.4 Data Extensions Purpose Required Changes to the Metamodel 34.4.5 Infrastructure Consolidation Extensions Purpose Required Changes to the Metamodel 34.4.6 Motivation Extensions Purpose Required Changes to the Metamodel 34.5 Content Metamodel Entities 34.6 Content Metamodel Attributes 34.7 Metamodel Relationships Footnotes 35. Architectural Artifacts 35.1 Basic Concepts 35.1.1 Simple Example of a Viewpoint and View 35.2 Developing Views in the ADM 35.2.1 General Guidelines 35.2.2 View Creation Process 35.3 Views, Tools, and Languages 35.3.1 Overview 35.4 Views and Viewpoints 35.4.1 Example of Views and Viewpoints 35.4.2 Views and Viewpoints in Enterprise Architecture 35.4.3 Need for a Common Language and Interoperable Tools for Architecture Description 35.5 Conclusions 35.6 Architectural Artifacts by ADM Phase 35.6.1 Preliminary Phase Principles Catalog 35.6.2 Phase A: Architecture Vision Stakeholder Map Matrix Value Chain Diagram Solution Concept Diagram 35.6.3 Phase B: Business Architecture Organization/Actor Catalog Driver/Goal/Objective Catalog Role Catalog Business Service/Function Catalog Location Catalog Process/Event/Control/Product Catalog Contract/Measure Catalog Business Interaction Matrix Actor/Role Matrix Business Footprint Diagram Business Service/Information Diagram Functional Decomposition Diagram Product Lifecycle Diagram Goal/Objective/Service Diagram Business Use-Case Diagram Organization Decomposition Diagram Process Flow Diagram Event Diagram 35.6.4 Phase C: Data Architecture Data Entity/Data Component Catalog Data Entity/Business Function Matrix Application/Data Matrix Conceptual Data Diagram Logical Data Diagram Data Dissemination Diagram Data Security Diagram Data Migration Diagram Data Lifecycle Diagram 35.6.5 Phase C: Application Architecture Application Portfolio Catalog Interface Catalog Application/Organization Matrix Role/Application Matrix Application/Function Matrix Application Interaction Matrix Application Communication Diagram Application and User Location Diagram Application Use-Case Diagram Enterprise Manageability Diagram Process/Application Realization Diagram Software Engineering Diagram Application Migration Diagram Software Distribution Diagram 35.6.6 Phase D: Technology Architecture Technology Standards Catalog Technology Portfolio Catalog Application/Technology Matrix Environments and Locations Diagram Platform Decomposition Diagram Processing Diagram Networked Computing/Hardware Diagram Communications Engineering Diagram 35.6.7 Phase E: Opportunities and Solutions Project Context Diagram Benefits Diagram 35.6.8 Requirements Management Requirements Catalog 35.7 Recommended Architecture Views to be Developed 35.7.1 Developing a Business Architecture View 35.7.1.1 Stakeholders and Concerns 35.7.1.2 Developing the View 35.7.1.3 Key Issues 35.7.2 Developing an Enterprise Security View 35.7.2.1 Stakeholders and Concerns 35.7.2.2 Developing the View 35.7.2.3 Basic Concepts Information Domains Strict Isolation Absolute Protection 35.7.2.4 Security Generic Architecture View 35.7.2.5 Security Services Allocation Operating System Services Network Services System Security Management Services 35.7.3 Developing a Software Engineering View 35.7.3.1 Stakeholders and Concerns Development Approach Software Modularity and Re-Use Portability Migration and Interoperability 35.7.3.2 Key Issues Data-Intensive versus Information-Intensive Software Systems Achieving Interoperability Software Tiers Two-Tier Three-Tier Five-Tier Some Uses of a Data Access Tier One Possible Instantiation of a DAI DAIs Enable Flexibility Distribution Infrastructure Bus 35.7.3.3 Conclusion 35.7.4 Developing a System Engineering View 35.7.4.1 Stakeholders and Concerns 35.7.4.2 Key Issues Client/Server Model Master/Slave and Hierarchic Models Peer-to-Peer Model Distributed Object Management Model 35.7.5 Developing a Communications Engineering View 35.7.5.1 Stakeholders and Concerns 35.7.5.2 Key Issues Communications Infrastructure Communications Models The OSI Reference Model Communications Framework Allocation of Services to Components 35.7.6 Developing a Data Flow View 35.7.6.1 Stakeholders and Concerns 35.7.6.2 Developing the View 35.7.6.3 Key Issues Database Management Systems Database Models Distributed DBMSs Distributed Heterogeneous DBMSs Data Dictionary/Directory Systems Data Administration Repository Database Administration Data Security 35.7.7 Developing an Enterprise Manageability View 35.7.7.1 Stakeholders and Concerns 35.7.7.2 Developing the View 35.7.7.3 Key Issues 35.7.8 Developing an Acquirer View 35.7.8.1 Stakeholders and Concerns 35.7.8.2 Developing the View 35.7.8.3 Key Issues Footnotes 36. Architecture Deliverables 36.1 Introduction 36.2 Deliverable Descriptions 36.2.1 Architecture Building Blocks 36.2.2 Architecture Contract Purpose Content 36.2.3 Architecture Definition Document Purpose Content 36.2.4 Architecture Principles Purpose Content 36.2.5 Architecture Repository Purpose Content 36.2.6 Architecture Requirements Specification Purpose Content 36.2.7 Architecture Roadmap Purpose Content 36.2.8 Architecture Vision Purpose Content 36.2.9 Business Principles, Business Goals, and Business Drivers Purpose Content 36.2.10 Capability Assessment Purpose Content 36.2.11 Change Request Purpose Content 36.2.12 Communications Plan Purpose Content 36.2.13 Compliance Assessment Purpose Content 36.2.14 Implementation and Migration Plan Purpose Content 36.2.15 Implementation Governance Model Purpose Content 36.2.16 Organizational Model for Enterprise Architecture Purpose Content 36.2.17 Request for Architecture Work Purpose Content 36.2.18 Requirements Impact Assessment Purpose Content 36.2.19 Solution Building Blocks 36.2.20 Statement of Architecture Work Purpose Content 36.2.21 Tailored Architecture Framework Purpose Content 37. Building Blocks 37.1 Overview 37.2 Introduction to Building Blocks 37.2.1 Overview 37.2.2 Generic Characteristics 37.2.3 Architecture Building Blocks 37.2.3.1 Characteristics 37.2.3.2 Specification Content 37.2.4 Solution Building Blocks 37.2.4.1 Characteristics 37.2.4.2 Specification Content 37.3 Building Blocks and the ADM 37.3.1 Basic Principles 37.3.1.1 Building Blocks in Architecture Design 37.3.1.2 Building Block Design 37.3.2 Building Block Specification Process in the ADM Footnotes 38. Introduction 38.1 Introduction 38.2 Structure of Part V 39. Enterprise Continuum 39.1 Overview 39.2 Enterprise Continuum and Architecture Re-Use 39.3 Constituents of the Enterprise Continuum 39.4 Enterprise Continuum in Detail 39.4.1 Architecture Continuum Foundation Architecture Common Systems Architectures Industry Architectures Organization-Specific Architectures 39.4.2 Solutions Continuum Foundation Solutions Common Systems Solutions Industry Solutions Organization-Specific Solutions 39.5 The Enterprise Continuum and the ADM 39.6 The Enterprise Continuum and Your Organization 39.6.1 Relationships 39.6.2 Your Enterprise 40. Architecture Partitioning 40.1 Overview 40.2 Applying Classification to Create Partitioned Architectures 40.2.1 Activities within the Preliminary Phase 40.3 Integration 41. Architecture Repository 41.1 Overview 41.2 Architecture Landscape 41.3 Reference Library 41.3.1 Overview 41.4 Standards Information Base 41.4.1 Overview 41.4.2 Types of Standard 41.4.3 Standards Lifecycle 41.4.4 Standards Classification within the Standards Information Base 41.5 Governance Log 41.5.1 Overview 41.5.2 Contents of the Governance Log 41.6 The Enterprise Repository 41.6.1 Requirements Repository 41.6.2 Solutions Repository 41.7 External Repositories 41.7.1 External Reference Models 41.7.2 External Standards 41.7.3 Architecture Board Approvals 42. Tools for Architecture Development 42.1 Overview 42.2 Issues in Tool Standardization 43. Foundation Architecture: Technical Reference Model 43.1 Concepts 43.1.1 Role of the TRM in the Foundation Architecture 43.1.2 TRM Components 43.1.3 Other TRMs 43.2 High-Level Breakdown 43.2.1 Overview 43.2.2 Portability and Interoperability 43.3 TRM in Detail 43.3.1 Introduction 43.3.2 TRM Entities and Interfaces 43.3.3 Application Software 43.3.3.1 Business Applications 43.3.3.2 Infrastructure Applications 43.3.4 Application Platform 43.3.4.1 Platform Concept 43.3.4.2 Extending the TRM 43.3.4.3 Interfaces Between Services 43.3.4.4 Future Developments 43.3.5 Communications Infrastructure 43.3.6 Application Platform Interface 43.3.7 Communications Infrastructure Interface 43.3.8 Qualities 43.4 Application Platform - Taxonomy 43.4.1 Basic Principles 43.4.2 Application Platform Service Categories 43.4.2.1 Object-Oriented Provision of Services 43.4.3 Application Platform Service Qualities 43.4.3.1 Principles 43.4.3.2 Taxonomy of Service Qualities 43.5 Detailed Platform Taxonomy 43.5.1 Data Interchange Services 43.5.2 Data Management Services 43.5.3 Graphics and Imaging Services 43.5.4 International Operation Services 43.5.5 Location and Directory Services 43.5.6 Network Services 43.5.7 Operating System Services 43.5.8 Software Engineering Services 43.5.9 Transaction Processing Services 43.5.10 User Interface Services 43.5.11 Security Services 43.5.12 System and Network Management Services 43.5.13 Object-Oriented Provision of Services 44. Integrated Information Infrastructure Reference Model 44.1 Basic Concepts 44.1.1 Background 44.1.2 Components of the Model 44.1.3 Relationship to Other parts of TOGAF 44.1.4 Key Business and Technical Drivers 44.1.4.1 Problem Space: The Need for Boundaryless Information Flow 44.1.4.2 Solution Space: The Need for Integrated Information Infrastructure 44.1.5 Status of the III-RM 44.2 High-Level View 44.2.1 Derivation of the III-RM from the TRM 44.2.2 High-Level III-RM Graphic 44.2.3 Components of the High-Level III-RM 44.3 Detailed Taxonomy 44.3.1 Detailed III-RM Graphic 44.3.2 Business Applications 44.3.2.1 Information Provider Applications 44.3.2.2 Brokerage Applications 44.3.2.3 Information Consumer Applications 44.3.3 Infrastructure Applications 44.3.3.1 Development Tools Business Modeling Tools Design Modeling Tools Implementation and Construction Tools Data Modeling Tools Deployment Tools Libraries 44.3.3.2 Management Utilities Operations, Administration, and Management (OA&M) Utilities Quality of Service Manager Utilities Copy Management Utilities Storage Management Utilities 44.3.4 Application Platform 44.3.4.1 Software Engineering Services 44.3.4.2 Security Services 44.3.4.3 Location and Directory Services 44.3.4.4 Human Interaction Services 44.3.4.5 Data Interchange Services 44.3.4.6 Data Management Services 44.3.4.7 Additional Operating System Services 44.3.5 Qualities Footnotes 45. Introduction 45.1 Overview 45.2 Structure of Part VII 46. Establishing an Architecture Capability 46.1 Overview 46.2 Phase A: Architecture Vision 46.3 Phase B: Business Architecture 46.4 Phase C: Data Architecture 46.5 Phase C: Application Architecture 46.6 Phase D: Technology Architecture 46.7 Phase E: Opportunities & Solutions 46.8 Phase F: Migration Planning 46.9 Phase G: Implementation Governance 46.10 Phase H: Architecture Change Management 46.11 Requirements Management 47. Architecture Board 47.1 Role 47.2 Responsibilities 47.3 Setting Up the Architecture Board 47.3.1 Triggers 47.3.2 Size of the Board 47.3.3 Board Structure 47.4 Operation of the Architecture Board 47.4.1 General 47.4.2 Preparation 47.4.3 Agenda Minutes of Previous Meeting Requests for Change Dispensations Compliance Assessments Dispute Resolution Architecture Strategy and Direction Documentation Actions Assigned Contract Documentation Management Any Other Business (AOB) Schedule of Meetings 48. Architecture Compliance 48.1 Introduction 48.2 Terminology: The Meaning of Architecture Compliance 48.3 Architecture Compliance Reviews 48.3.1 Purpose 48.3.2 Timing 48.3.3 Governance and Personnel Scenarios 48.4 Architecture Compliance Review Process 48.4.1 Overview 48.4.2 Roles 48.4.3 Steps 48.5 Architecture Compliance Review Checklists 48.5.1 Hardware and Operating System Checklist 48.5.2 Software Services and Middleware Checklist 48.5.3 Applications Checklists 48.5.3.1 Infrastructure (Enterprise Productivity) Applications 48.5.3.2 Business Applications 48.5.3.3 Application Integration Approach 48.5.4 Information Management Checklists 48.5.4.1 Data Values 48.5.4.2 Data Definition 48.5.4.3 Security/Protection 48.5.4.4 Hosting, Data Types, and Sharing 48.5.4.5 Common Services 48.5.4.6 Access Method 48.5.5 Security Checklist 48.5.6 System Management Checklist 48.5.7 System Engineering/Overall Architecture Checklists 48.5.7.1 General 48.5.7.2 Processors/Servers/Clients 48.5.7.3 Client 48.5.7.4 Application Server 48.5.7.5 Data Server 48.5.7.6 COTS (where applicable) 48.5.8 System Engineering/Methods & Tools Checklist 48.6 Architecture Compliance Review Guidelines 48.6.1 Tailoring the Checklists 48.6.2 Conducting Architecture Compliance Reviews 49. Architecture Contracts 49.1 Role 49.2 Contents 49.2.1 Statement of Architecture Work 49.2.2 Contract between Architecture Design and Development Partners 49.2.3 Contract between Architecting Function and Business Users 49.3 Relationship to Architecture Governance 50. Architecture Governance 50.1 Introduction 50.1.1 Levels of Governance within the Enterprise 50.1.2 Nature of Governance 50.1.2.1 Governance: A Generic Perspective 50.1.2.2 Characteristics of Governance 50.1.3 Technology Governance 50.1.4 IT Governance 50.1.4.1 An IT Controls Framework - COBIT 50.1.5 Architecture Governance: Overview 50.1.5.1 Architecture Governance Characteristics 50.1.5.2 Architecture Governance as a Board-Level Responsibility 50.1.5.3 TOGAF and Architecture Governance 50.2 Architecture Governance Framework 50.2.1 Architecture Governance Framework - Conceptual Structure 50.2.1.1 Key Concepts 50.2.1.2 Key Architecture Governance Processes Policy Management and Take-On Compliance Dispensation Monitoring and Reporting Business Control Environment Management 50.2.2 Architecture Governance Framework - Organizational Structure 50.2.2.1 Overview 50.2.2.2 Key Areas 50.2.2.3 Operational Benefits 50.3 Architecture Governance in Practice 50.3.1 Architecture Governance - Key Success Factors 50.3.2 Elements of an Effective Architecture Governance Strategy 50.3.2.1 Architecture Governance and Corporate Politics Footnotes 51. Architecture Maturity Models 51.1 Overview 51.2 Background 51.3 US DoC ACMM Framework 51.3.1 Overview 51.3.2 Elements of the ACMM 51.3.3 Example: Enterprise Architecture Process Maturity Levels Level 0: None Level 1: Initial Level 2: Under Development Level 3: Defined Level 4: Managed Level 5: Optimizing 51.4 Capability Maturity Models Integration (CMMI) 51.4.1 Introduction 51.4.2 SCAMPI Method 51.5 Conclusions Footnotes 52. Architecture Skills Framework 52.1 Introduction 52.2 Need for an Enterprise Architecture Skills Framework 52.2.1 Definitional Rigor 52.2.2 Basis of an Internal Architecture Practice 52.3 Goals/Rationale 52.3.1 Certification of Enterprise Architects 52.3.2 Specific Benefits 52.4 Enterprise Architecture Role and Skill Categories 52.4.1 Overview 52.4.2 TOGAF Roles 52.4.3 Categories of Skills 52.4.4 Proficiency Levels 52.5 Enterprise Architecture Role and Skill Definitions 52.5.1 Generic Skills 52.5.2 Business Skills & Methods 52.5.3 Enterprise Architecture Skills 52.5.4 Program or Project Management Skills 52.5.5 IT General Knowledge Skills 52.5.6 Technical IT Skills 52.5.7 Legal Environment 52.6 Generic Role and Skills of the Enterprise Architect 52.6.1 Generic Role 52.6.2 Characterization in Terms of the Enterprise Continuum 52.6.3 Key Characteristics of an Enterprise Architect 52.6.3.1 Skills and Experience in Producing Designs 52.6.3.2 Extensive Technical Breadth, with Technical Depth in One or a Few Disciplines 52.6.3.3 Method-Driven Approach to Execution 52.6.3.4 Full Project Scope Experience 52.6.3.5 Leadership 52.6.3.6 Personal and Professional Skills 52.6.3.7 Skills and Experience in One or More Industries 52.7 Conclusions A. Glossary of Supplementary Definitions A.1 Access Control (AC) A.2 Ada A.3 Application Component A.4 Application Software A.5 Availability A.6 Batch Processing A.7 Business System A.8 Catalog A.9 Client A.10 COBIT A.11 Communications Network A.12 Communications Node A.13 Communications System A.14 Composite Application A.15 Configuration Management A.16 Connectivity Service A.17 Contract A.18 Control A.19 CxO A.20 Data Dictionary A.21 Data Element A.22 Data Entity A.23 Data Interchange Service A.24 Data Management Service A.25 Database A.26 Database Management System A.27 Directory Service A.28 Distributed Database A.29 Driver A.30 End User A.31 Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) System A.32 Event A.33 External Environment Interface (EEI) A.34 FORTRAN A.35 Functional Decomposition A.36 Goal A.37 Guideline A.38 Hardware A.39 Human Computer Interface (HCI) A.40 Information Domain A.41 Information System (IS) A.42 Information System Service A.43 Interaction A.44 Interaction Model A.45 Interface A.46 ITIL A.47 Key Performance Indicator (KPI) A.48 Lifecycle A.49 Location A.50 Logical Application Component A.51 Logical Data Component A.52 Logical Technology Component A.53 Managing Successful Programs (MSP) A.54 Matrix A.55 Measure A.56 Metaview A.57 Multimedia Service A.58 Open Specifications A.59 Open System A.60 Operational Governance A.61 Operating System Service A.62 Packaged Services A.63 Physical Application Component A.64 Physical Data Component A.65 Physical Technology Component A.66 Portability A.67 Portfolio A.68 PRINCE2 A.69 Process A.70 Product A.71 Profile A.72 Profiling A.73 Program A.74 Project A.75 Risk Management A.76 Scalability A.77 Security A.78 Server A.79 Service A.80 Service Quality A.81 SMART A.82 Supplier Management A.83 System A.84 System and Network Management Service A.85 System Stakeholder A.86 Technology Component A.87 Time Period A.88 Transaction A.89 Transaction Sequence A.90 Use-Case A.91 User A.92 User Interface Service B. Abbreviations INDEX
Summary: TOGAF es un marco - un método detallado y un conjunto de herramientas de apoyo - para el desarrollo de una arquitectura empresarial, desarrollado por los miembros de El Foro Open Group Architecture. TOGAF Versión 9.1 es una actualización de mantenimiento de TOGAF 9, dirigiéndose a los comentarios planteados desde la introducción de TOGAF 9 en 2009. Conserva las características principales y la estructura de TOGAF 9, preservando así la inversión existente en TOGAF, y agrega más detalle y aclaración a lo que es ya probado. Puede ser utilizado libremente por cualquier organización que desee desarrollar una arquitectura de la empresa para su uso dentro de esa organización (sujeto a las Condiciones de Uso). Este libro se divide en siete partes.
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Incluye índice.

Frontmatter
Preface
This Document
Intended Audience
Keywords
About The Open Group
Participants
Architecture Forum Technical Reviewers
Architecture Forum Members
Trademarks
Acknowledgements
Referenced Documents
1. Introduction
1.1 Structure of the TOGAF Document
1.2 Executive Overview
What is an enterprise?
Why do I need an enterprise architecture?
What specifically would prompt me to develop an enterprise architecture?
What is an architecture framework?
Why do I need TOGAF as a framework for enterprise architecture?
Who would benefit from using TOGAF?
2. Core Concepts
2.1 What is TOGAF?
2.2 What is Architecture in the Context of TOGAF?
2.3 What Kind of Architecture Does TOGAF Deal With?
2.4 Architecture Development Method
2.5 Deliverables, Artifacts, and Building Blocks
2.6 Enterprise Continuum
2.7 Architecture Repository
2.8 Establishing and Maintaining an Enterprise Architecture Capability
2.9 Establishing the Architecture Capability as an Operational Entity
2.10 Using TOGAF with Other Frameworks
3. Definitions
3.1 Abstraction
3.2 Actor
3.3 Application
3.4 Application Architecture
3.5 Application Platform
3.6 Application Platform Interface (API)
3.7 Architectural Style
3.8 Architecture
3.9 Architecture Building Block (ABB)
3.10 Architecture Continuum
3.11 Architecture Development Method (ADM)
3.12 Architecture Domain
3.13 Architecture Framework
3.14 Architecture Governance
3.15 Architecture Landscape
3.16 Architecture Principles
3.17 Architecture Vision
3.18 Artifact
3.19 Baseline
3.20 Boundaryless Information Flow
3.21 Building Block
3.22 Business Architecture
3.23 Business Function
3.24 Business Governance
3.25 Business Service
3.26 Capability
3.27 Capability Architecture
3.28 Capability Increment
3.29 Communications and Stakeholder Management
3.30 Concerns
3.31 Constraint
3.32 Data Architecture
3.33 Deliverable
3.34 Enterprise
3.35 Enterprise Continuum
3.36 Foundation Architecture
3.37 Framework
3.38 Gap
3.39 Governance
3.40 Information
3.41 Information Technology (IT)
3.42 Interoperability
3.43 Logical
3.44 Metadata
3.45 Metamodel
3.46 Method
3.47 Methodology
3.48 Model
3.49 Modeling
3.50 Objective
3.51 Patterns
3.52 Performance Management
3.53 Physical
3.54 Platform
3.55 Platform Service
3.56 Principle
3.57 Reference Model (RM)
3.58 Repository
3.59 Requirement
3.60 Roadmap
3.61 Role
3.62 Segment Architecture
3.63 Service Orientation
3.64 Service Oriented Architecture (SOA)
3.65 Solution Architecture
3.66 Solution Building Block (SBB)
3.67 Solutions Continuum
3.68 Stakeholder
3.69 Standards Information Base (SIB)
3.70 Strategic Architecture
3.71 Target Architecture
3.72 Taxonomy of Architecture Views
3.73 Technology Architecture
3.74 Transition Architecture
3.75 View
3.76 Viewpoint
3.77 Work Package
4. Release Notes
4.1 What's New in TOGAF 9?
Modular Structure
Content Framework
Extended Guidance on Adopting TOGAF within an Enterprise
Explicit Consideration of Architectural Styles, Including SOA and Security Architecture
Additional ADM Detail
4.1.1 Changes Applied in this Edition
4.2 The Benefits of TOGAF 9
Greater Usability
More Focus on Holistic Enterprise Change
More Consistency of Output
4.3 Mapping of the TOGAF 8.1.1 Structure to TOGAF 9
Part I: Introduction
Part II: Architecture Development Method
Part III: Enterprise Continuum
Part IV: Resource Base
4.4 Mapping of TOGAF 9 Structure to TOGAF 8.1.1
4.5 Using TOGAF
4.5.1 Conditions of Use
4.5.2 How Much Does TOGAF Cost?
4.5.3 Downloads
4.6 Why Join The Open Group?
5. Introduction
5.1 ADM Overview
5.1.1 The ADM, Enterprise Continuum, and Architecture Repository
5.1.2 The ADM and the Foundation Architecture
5.1.3 ADM and Supporting Guidelines and Techniques
5.2 Architecture Development Cycle
5.2.1 Key Points
5.2.2 Basic Structure
5.3 Adapting the ADM
5.4 Architecture Governance
5.5 Scoping the Architecture
5.5.1 Breadth
5.5.2 Depth
5.5.3 Time Period
5.5.4 Architecture Domains
5.6 Architecture Integration
5.7 Summary
6. Preliminary Phase
6.1 Objectives
6.2 Approach
6.2.1 Enterprise
6.2.2 Organizational Context
6.2.3 Requirements for Architecture Work
6.2.4 Principles
6.2.5 Management Frameworks
6.2.6 Relating the Management Frameworks
6.2.7 Planning for Enterprise Architecture/Business Change Maturity Evaluation
6.3 Inputs
6.3.1 Reference Materials External to the Enterprise
6.3.2 Non-Architectural Inputs
6.3.3 Architectural Inputs
6.4 Steps
6.4.1 Scope the Enterprise Organizations Impacted
6.4.2 Confirm Governance and Support Frameworks
6.4.3 Define and Establish Enterprise Architecture Team and Organization
6.4.4 Identify and Establish Architecture Principles
6.4.5 Tailor TOGAF and, if any, Other Selected Architecture Framework(s)
6.4.6 Implement Architecture Tools
6.5 Outputs
7. Phase A: Architecture Vision
7.1 Objectives
7.2 Approach
7.2.1 General
7.2.2 Creating the Architecture Vision
7.2.3 Business Scenarios
7.3 Inputs
7.3.1 Reference Materials External to the Enterprise
7.3.2 Non-Architectural Inputs
7.3.3 Architectural Inputs
7.4 Steps
7.4.1 Establish the Architecture Project
7.4.2 Identify Stakeholders, Concerns, and Business Requirements
7.4.3 Confirm and Elaborate Business Goals, Business Drivers, and Constraints
7.4.4 Evaluate Business Capabilities
7.4.5 Assess Readiness for Business Transformation
7.4.6 Define Scope
7.4.7 Confirm and Elaborate Architecture Principles, including Business Principles
7.4.8 Develop Architecture Vision
7.4.9 Define the Target Architecture Value Propositions and KPIs
7.4.10 Identify the Business Transformation Risks and Mitigation Activities
7.4.11 Develop Statement of Architecture Work; Secure Approval
7.5 Outputs
8. Phase B: Business Architecture
8.1 Objectives
8.2 Approach
8.2.1 General
8.2.2 Developing the Baseline Description
8.2.3 Business Modeling
8.2.4 Architecture Repository
8.3 Inputs
8.3.1 Reference Materials External to the Enterprise
8.3.2 Non-Architectural Inputs
8.3.3 Architectural Inputs
8.4 Steps
8.4.1 Select Reference Models, Viewpoints, and Tools
8.4.1.1 Determine Overall Modeling Process
8.4.1.2 Identify Required Service Granularity Level, Boundaries, and Contracts
8.4.1.3 Identify Required Catalogs of Business Building Blocks
8.4.1.4 Identify Required Matrices
8.4.1.5 Identify Required Diagrams
8.4.1.6 Identify Types of Requirement to be Collected
8.4.2 Develop Baseline Business Architecture Description
8.4.3 Develop Target Business Architecture Description
8.4.4 Perform Gap Analysis
8.4.5 Define Candidate Roadmap Components
8.4.6 Resolve Impacts Across the Architecture Landscape
8.4.7 Conduct Formal Stakeholder Review
8.4.8 Finalize the Business Architecture
8.4.9 Create Architecture Definition Document
8.5 Outputs
9. Phase C: Information Systems Architectures
9.1 Objectives
9.2 Approach
9.3 Inputs
9.3.1 Reference Materials External to the Enterprise
9.3.2 Non-Architectural Inputs
9.3.3 Architectural Inputs
9.4 Steps
9.5 Outputs
10. Phase C: Information Systems Architectures - Data Architecture
10.1 Objectives
10.2 Approach
10.2.1 Key Considerations for Data Architecture
10.2.1.1 Data Management
10.2.1.2 Data Migration
10.2.1.3 Data Governance
10.2.2 Architecture Repository
10.3 Inputs
10.3.1 Reference Materials External to the Enterprise
10.3.2 Non-Architectural Inputs
10.3.3 Architectural Inputs
10.4 Steps
10.4.1 Select Reference Models, Viewpoints, and Tools
10.4.1.1 Determine Overall Modeling Process
10.4.1.2 Identify Required Catalogs of Data Building Blocks
10.4.1.3 Identify Required Matrices
10.4.1.4 Identify Required Diagrams
10.4.1.5 Identify Types of Requirement to be Collected
10.4.2 Develop Baseline Data Architecture Description
10.4.3 Develop Target Data Architecture Description
10.4.4 Perform Gap Analysis
10.4.5 Define Candidate Roadmap Components
10.4.6 Resolve Impacts Across the Architecture Landscape
10.4.7 Conduct Formal Stakeholder Review
10.4.8 Finalize the Data Architecture
10.4.9 Create Architecture Definition Document
10.5 Outputs
11. Phase C: Information Systems Architectures - Application Architecture
11.1 Objectives
11.2 Approach
11.2.1 Architecture Repository
11.3 Inputs
11.3.1 Reference Materials External to the Enterprise
11.3.2 Non-Architectural Inputs
11.3.3 Architectural Inputs
11.4 Steps
11.4.1 Select Reference Models, Viewpoints, and Tools
11.4.1.1 Determine Overall Modeling Process
11.4.1.2 Identify Required Catalogs of Application Building Blocks
11.4.1.3 Identify Required Matrices
11.4.1.4 Identify Required Diagrams
11.4.1.5 Identify Types of Requirement to be Collected
11.4.2 Develop Baseline Application Architecture Description
11.4.3 Develop Target Application Architecture Description
11.4.4 Perform Gap Analysis
11.4.5 Define Candidate Roadmap Components
11.4.6 Resolve Impacts Across the Architecture Landscape
11.4.7 Conduct Formal Stakeholder Review
11.4.8 Finalize the Application Architecture
11.4.9 Create Architecture Definition Document
11.5 Outputs
12. Phase D: Technology Architecture
12.1 Objectives
12.2 Approach
12.2.1 Architecture Repository
12.3 Inputs
12.3.1 Reference Materials External to the Enterprise
12.3.2 Non-Architectural Inputs
12.3.3 Architectural Inputs
12.4 Steps
12.4.1 Select Reference Models, Viewpoints, and Tools
12.4.1.1 Determine Overall Modeling Process
12.4.1.2 Identify Required Catalogs of Technology Building Blocks
12.4.1.3 Identify Required Matrices
12.4.1.4 Identify Required Diagrams
12.4.1.5 Identify Types of Requirement to be Collected
12.4.1.6 Select Services
12.4.2 Develop Baseline Technology Architecture Description
12.4.3 Develop Target Technology Architecture Description
12.4.4 Perform Gap Analysis
12.4.5 Define Candidate Roadmap Components
12.4.6 Resolve Impacts Across the Architecture Landscape
12.4.7 Conduct Formal Stakeholder Review
12.4.8 Finalize the Technology Architecture
12.4.9 Create Architecture Definition Document
12.5 Outputs
12.6 Postscript
13. Phase E: Opportunities & Solutions
13.1 Objectives
13.2 Approach
13.3 Inputs
13.3.1 Reference Materials External to the Enterprise
13.3.2 Non-Architectural Inputs
13.3.3 Architectural Inputs
13.4 Steps
13.4.1 Determine/Confirm Key Corporate Change Attributes
13.4.2 Determine Business Constraints for Implementation
13.4.3 Review and Consolidate Gap Analysis Results from Phases B to D
13.4.4 Review Consolidated Requirements Across Related Business Functions
13.4.5 Consolidate and Reconcile Interoperability Requirements
13.4.6 Refine and Validate Dependencies
13.4.7 Confirm Readiness and Risk for Business Transformation
13.4.8 Formulate Implementation and Migration Strategy
13.4.9 Identify and Group Major Work Packages
13.4.10 Identify Transition Architectures
13.4.11 Create the Architecture Roadmap & Implementation and Migration Plan
13.5 Outputs
14. Phase F: Migration Planning
14.1 Objectives
14.2 Approach
14.3 Inputs
14.3.1 Reference Materials External to the Enterprise
14.3.2 Non-Architectural Inputs
14.3.3 Architectural Inputs
14.4 Steps
14.4.1 Confirm Management Framework Interactions for the Implementation and Migration Plan
14.4.2 Assign a Business Value to Each Work Package
14.4.3 Estimate Resource Requirements, Project Timings, and Availability/Delivery Vehicle
14.4.4 Prioritize the Migration Projects through the Conduct of a Cost/Benefit Assessment and Risk Validation
14.4.5 Confirm Architecture Roadmap and Update Architecture Definition Document
14.4.6 Generate the Implementation and Migration Plan
14.4.7 Complete the Architecture Development Cycle and Document Lessons Learned
14.5 Outputs
15. Phase G: Implementation Governance
15.1 Objectives
15.2 Approach
15.3 Inputs
15.3.1 Reference Materials External to the Enterprise
15.3.2 Non-Architectural Inputs
15.3.3 Architectural Inputs
15.4 Steps
15.4.1 Confirm Scope and Priorities for Deployment with Development Management
15.4.2 Identify Deployment Resources and Skills
15.4.3 Guide Development of Solutions Deployment
15.4.4 Perform Enterprise Architecture Compliance Reviews
15.4.5 Implement Business and IT Operations
15.4.6 Perform Post-Implementation Review and Close the Implementation
15.5 Outputs
16. Phase H: Architecture Change Management
16.1 Objectives
16.2 Approach
16.2.1 Drivers for Change
16.2.2 Enterprise Architecture Change Management Process
16.2.3 Guidelines for Maintenance versus Architecture Redesign
16.3 Inputs
16.3.1 Reference Materials External to the Enterprise
16.3.2 Non-Architectural Inputs
16.3.3 Architectural Inputs
16.4 Steps
16.4.1 Establish Value Realization Process
16.4.2 Deploy Monitoring Tools
16.4.3 Manage Risks
16.4.4 Provide Analysis for Architecture Change Management
16.4.5 Develop Change Requirements to Meet Performance Targets
16.4.6 Manage Governance Process
16.4.7 Activate the Process to Implement Change
16.5 Outputs
17. ADM Architecture Requirements Management
17.1 Objectives
17.2 Approach
17.2.1 General
17.2.2 Requirements Development
17.2.3 Resources
17.2.3.1 Business Scenarios
17.2.3.2 Requirements Tools
17.3 Inputs
17.4 Steps
17.5 Outputs
18. Introduction
18.1 Guidelines for Adapting the ADM Process
18.2 Techniques for Architecture Development
18.3 Using TOGAF with Different Architectural Styles
19. Applying Iteration to the ADM
19.1 Overview
19.2 Iteration Cycles
19.3 Classes of Architecture Engagement
19.4 Approaches to Architecture Development
19.5 Iteration Considerations
19.5.1 Iteration between ADM Cycles
19.5.2 Iteration within an ADM Cycle
19.6 Conclusions
Footnotes
20. Applying the ADM across the Architecture Landscape
20.1 Overview
20.2 Architecture Landscape
20.3 Organizing the Architecture Landscape to Understand the State of the Enterprise
20.4 Developing Architectures at Different Levels
21. Security Architecture and the ADM
21.1 Overview
21.2 Introduction
21.3 Guidance on Security for the Architecture Domains
21.4 ADM Architecture Requirements Management
Is our security good?
Nothing useful can be said about a security measure outside the context of an application, or a system and its environment
21.5 Preliminary Phase
Scope the enterprise organizations impacted by the security architecture
Define and document applicable regulatory and security policy requirements
Define the required security capability as part of Architecture Capability
Implement security architecture tools
21.5.1 Security Inputs
21.5.2 Security Outputs
21.6 Phase A: Architecture Vision
Obtain management support for security measures
Define necessary security-related management sign-off milestones of this architecture development cycle
Determine and document applicable disaster recovery or business continuity plans/requirements
Identify and document the anticipated physical/business/regulatory environment(s) in which the system(s) will be deployed
Determine and document the criticality of the system: safety-critical/mission-critical/non-critical
21.6.1 Security Inputs
21.6.2 Security Outputs
21.7 Phase B: Business Architecture
Determine who are the legitimate actors who will interact with the product/service/process
Assess and baseline current security-specific business processes (enhancement of existing objective)
Determine whom/how much it is acceptable to inconvenience in utilizing security measures
Identify and document interconnecting systems beyond project control
Determine the assets at risk if something goes wrong - "What are we trying to protect?"
Determine the cost (both qualitative and quantitative) of asset loss/impact in failure cases
Identify and document the ownership of assets
Determine and document appropriate security forensic processes
Identify the criticality of the availability and correct operation of the overall service
Determine and document how much security (cost) is justified by the threats and the value of the assets at risk
Reassess and confirm Architecture Vision decisions
Assess alignment or conflict of identified security policies with business goals
Determine "what can go wrong?"
21.7.1 Security Inputs
21.7.2 Security Outputs
21.8 Phase C: Information Systems Architectures
Assess and baseline current security-specific architecture elements (enhancement of existing objective)
Identify safe default actions and failure states
Identify and evaluate applicable recognized guidelines and standards
Revisit assumptions regarding interconnecting systems beyond project control
Determine and document the sensitivity or classification level of information stored/created/used
Identify and document custody of assets
Identify the criticality of the availability and correct operation of each function
Determine the relationship of the system under design with existing business disaster/continuity plans
Identify what aspects of the system must be configurable to reflect changes in policy/business environment/access control
Identify lifespan of information used as defined by business needs and regulatory requirements
Determine approaches to address identified risks:
Identify actions/events that warrant logging for later review or triggering forensic processes
Identify and document requirements for rigor in proving accuracy of logged events (non-repudiation)
Identify potential/likely avenues of attack
Determine "what can go wrong?"
21.8.1 Security Inputs
21.8.2 Security Outputs
21.9 Phase D: Technology Architecture
Assess and baseline current security-specific technologies (enhancement of existing objective)
Revisit assumptions regarding interconnecting systems beyond project control
Identify and evaluate applicable recognized guidelines and standards
Identify methods to regulate consumption of resources
Engineer a method by which the efficacy of security measures will be measured and communicated on an ongoing basis
Identify the trust (clearance) level of:
Identify minimal privileges required for any entity to achieve a technical or business objective
Identify mitigating security measures, where justified by risk assessment
Determine "what can go wrong?"
21.9.1 Security Inputs
21.9.2 Security Outputs
21.10 Phase E: Opportunities & Solutions
Identify existing security services available for re-use
Engineer mitigation measures addressing identified risks
Evaluate tested and re-usable security software and security system resources
Identify new code/resources/assets that are appropriate for re-use
Determine "what can go wrong?"
21.11 Phase F: Migration Planning
Assess the impact of new security measures upon other new components or existing leveraged systems
Implement assurance methods by which the efficacy of security measures will be measured and communicated on an ongoing basis
Identify correct secure installation parameters, initial conditions, and configurations
Implement disaster recovery and business continuity plans or modifications
Determine "what can go wrong?"
21.12 Phase G: Implementation Governance
Establish architecture artifact, design, and code reviews and define acceptance criteria for the successful implementation of the findings
Implement methods and procedures to review evidence produced by the system that reflects operational stability and adherence to security policies
Implement necessary training to ensure correct deployment, configuration, and operations of security-relevant subsystems and components; ensure awareness training of all users and non-privileged operators of the system and/or its components
Determine "what has gone wrong?"
21.13 Phase H: Architecture Change Management
Determine "what has gone wrong?"
Incorporate security-relevant changes to the environment into the requirements for future enhancement (enhancement of existing objective)
21.14 References
22. Using TOGAF to Define & Govern SOAs
22.1 Overview
22.2 Introduction
22.3 SOA Definition
22.4 SOA Features
22.5 Enterprise Architecture and SOA
22.6 SOA and Levels
22.6.1 Level of Detail of Implementation Specification
22.6.2 SOA Activities at Different Levels
22.7 Using TOGAF for SOA
22.7.1 Preliminary Phase
22.7.1.1 Principle of Service-Orientation
22.7.1.2 Governance and Support Strategy
22.7.1.3 Partitions and Centers of Excellence
22.7.1.4 Architecture Repository
22.7.2 Phase A: Architecture Vision
22.7.2.1 Stakeholders, Concerns, and Business Requirements
22.7.3 Architecture Development: Phases B, C, and D
Phase B: Business Architecture
Phase C: Information Systems Architectures
SOA-Specific Phase C Artifacts
Phase D: Technology Architecture
SOA-Specific Phase D Artifacts
Phase E: Opportunities and Solutions
SOA-Specific Phase E Artifacts
Phase F: Migration Planning
Phase G: Implementation Governance
Phase H: Architecture Change Management
22.8 Summary
23. Architecture Principles
23.1 Introduction
23.2 Characteristics of Architecture Principles
23.3 Components of Architecture Principles
23.4 Developing Architecture Principles
23.4.1 Qualities of Principles
23.5 Applying Architecture Principles
23.6 Example Set of Architecture Principles
23.6.1 Business Principles
Principle 1: Primary of Principles
Principle 2: Maximize Benefit to the Enterprise
Principle 3: Information Management is Everybody's Business
Principle 4: Business Continuity
Principle 5: Common Use Applications
Principle 6: Service Orientation
Principle 7: Compliance with Law
Principle 8: IT Responsibility
Principle 9: Protection of Intellectual Property
23.6.2 Data Principles
Principle 10: Data is an Asset
Principle 11: Data is Shared
Principle 12: Data is Accessible
Principle 13: Data Trustee
Principle 14: Common Vocabulary and Data Definitions
Principle 15: Data Security
23.6.3 Application Principles
Principle 16: Technology Independence
Principle 17: Ease-of-Use
23.6.4 Technology Principles
Principle 18: Requirements-Based Change
Principle 19: Responsive Change Management
Principle 20: Control Technical Diversity
Principle 21: Interoperability
24. Stakeholder Management
24.1 Introduction
24.2 Approach to Stakeholder Management
24.3 Steps in the Stakeholder Management Process
24.3.1 Identify Stakeholders
24.3.1.1 Sample Stakeholder Analysis
24.3.2 Classify Stakeholder Positions
24.3.3 Determine Stakeholder Management Approach
24.3.4 Tailor Engagement Deliverables
24.4 Template Stakeholder Map
25. Architecture Patterns
25.1 Introduction
25.1.1 Background
25.1.2 Content of a Pattern
25.1.3 Terminology
25.1.3.1 Architecture Patterns and Design Patterns
25.1.3.2 Patterns and the Architecture Continuum
25.1.3.3 Patterns and Views
25.1.3.4 Patterns and Business Scenarios
25.1.4 Architecture Patterns in Use
25.2 US Treasury Architecture Development Guidance (TADG)
25.2.1 TADG Pattern Content
25.2.2 TADG Architecture Patterns
25.3 IBM Patterns for e-Business
25.4 Some Pattern Resources
26. Business Scenarios and Business Goals
26.1 Introduction
26.2 Benefits of Business Scenarios
26.3 Creating the Business Scenario
26.3.1 Overall Process
26.3.2 Gathering
26.3.3 Analyzing
26.3.4 Reviewing
26.4 Contents of a Business Scenario
26.5 Contributions to the Business Scenario
26.6 Business Scenarios and the TOGAF ADM
26.7 Developing Business Scenarios
26.7.1 General Guidelines
26.7.2 Questions to Ask for Each Area
Identifying, Documenting, and Ranking the Problem
Identifying the Business & Technical Environment, and Documenting in Models
Identifying and Documenting Objectives
Identifying Human Actors and their Place in the Business Model
Identifying Computer Actors and their Place in the Technology Model
Documenting Roles, Responsibilities, Measures of Success, Required Scripts
Checking for Fitness-for-Purpose, and refining if necessary
26.8 Business Scenario Documentation
26.8.1 Textual Documentation
26.8.2 Business Scenario Models
26.9 Guidelines on Goals and Objectives
26.9.1 Importance of Goals
26.9.2 Importance of SMART Objectives
Example of Making Objectives SMART
26.9.3 Categories of Goals and Objectives
Goal: Improve Business Process Performance
Goal: Decrease Costs
Goal: Improve Business Operations
Goal: Improve Management Efficacy
Goal: Reduce Risk
Goal: Improve Effectiveness of IT Organization
Goal: Improve User Productivity
Goal: Improve Portability and Scalability
Goal: Improve Interoperability
Goal: Increase Vendor Independence
Goal: Reduce Lifecycle Costs
Goal: Improve Security
Goal: Improve Manageability
26.10 Summary
27. Gap Analysis
27.1 Introduction
27.2 Suggested Steps
27.3 Example
28. Migration Planning Techniques
28.1 Implementation Factor Assessment & Deduction Matrix
28.2 Consolidated Gaps, Solutions, & Dependencies Matrix
28.3 Architecture Definition Increments Table
28.4 Transition Architecture State Evolution Table
28.5 Business Value Assessment Technique
29. Interoperability Requirements
29.1 Overview
29.2 Defining Interoperability
29.3 Enterprise Operating Model
29.4 Refining Interoperability
29.5 Determining Interoperability Requirements
29.6 Reconciling Interoperability Requirements with Potential Solutions
29.7 Summary
Footnotes
30. Business Transformation Readiness Assessment
30.1 Introduction
30.1.1 Business Transformation Enablement Program (BTEP)
30.2 Determine Readiness Factors
30.3 Present Readiness Factors
30.4 Assess Readiness Factors
30.4.1 Readiness Factor Vision
30.4.2 Readiness Factor Rating
30.4.3 Readiness Factor Risks & Actions
30.5 Readiness and Migration Planning
30.6 Marketing the Implementation Plan
30.7 Conclusion
Footnotes
31. Risk Management
31.1 Introduction
31.2 Risk Classification
31.3 Risk Identification
31.4 Initial Risk Assessment
31.5 Risk Mitigation and Residual Risk Assessment
31.6 Conduct Residual Risk Assessment
31.7 Risk Monitoring and Governance (Phase G)
31.8 Summary
32. Capability-Based Planning
32.1 Overview
32.2 Capability-Based Planning Paradigm
32.3 Concept of Capability-Based Planning
32.3.1 Capability Dimensions
32.3.2 Capability Increments
32.4 Capabilities in an Enterprise Architecture Context
32.5 Summary
33. Introduction
33.1 Overview
33.2 Content Metamodel
33.3 Content Framework and the TOGAF ADM
33.4 Structure of Part IV
34. Content Metamodel
34.1 Overview
34.2 Content Metamodel Vision and Concepts
34.2.1 Core Content Metamodel Concepts
Core and Extension Content
Core Metamodel Entities
Catalog, Matrix, and Diagram Concept
34.2.2 Overview of the Content Metamodel
34.3 Content Metamodel in Detail
34.3.1 Core Content Metamodel
34.3.2 Core Architecture Artifacts
34.3.3 Full Content Metamodel
34.4 Content Metamodel Extensions
34.4.1 Governance Extensions
Purpose
Required Changes to the Metamodel
34.4.2 Services Extensions
Purpose
Required Changes to the Metamodel
34.4.3 Process Modeling Extensions
Purpose
Required Changes to the Metamodel
34.4.4 Data Extensions
Purpose
Required Changes to the Metamodel
34.4.5 Infrastructure Consolidation Extensions
Purpose
Required Changes to the Metamodel
34.4.6 Motivation Extensions
Purpose
Required Changes to the Metamodel
34.5 Content Metamodel Entities
34.6 Content Metamodel Attributes
34.7 Metamodel Relationships
Footnotes
35. Architectural Artifacts
35.1 Basic Concepts
35.1.1 Simple Example of a Viewpoint and View
35.2 Developing Views in the ADM
35.2.1 General Guidelines
35.2.2 View Creation Process
35.3 Views, Tools, and Languages
35.3.1 Overview
35.4 Views and Viewpoints
35.4.1 Example of Views and Viewpoints
35.4.2 Views and Viewpoints in Enterprise Architecture
35.4.3 Need for a Common Language and Interoperable Tools for Architecture Description
35.5 Conclusions
35.6 Architectural Artifacts by ADM Phase
35.6.1 Preliminary Phase
Principles Catalog
35.6.2 Phase A: Architecture Vision
Stakeholder Map Matrix
Value Chain Diagram
Solution Concept Diagram
35.6.3 Phase B: Business Architecture
Organization/Actor Catalog
Driver/Goal/Objective Catalog
Role Catalog
Business Service/Function Catalog
Location Catalog
Process/Event/Control/Product Catalog
Contract/Measure Catalog
Business Interaction Matrix
Actor/Role Matrix
Business Footprint Diagram
Business Service/Information Diagram
Functional Decomposition Diagram
Product Lifecycle Diagram
Goal/Objective/Service Diagram
Business Use-Case Diagram
Organization Decomposition Diagram
Process Flow Diagram
Event Diagram
35.6.4 Phase C: Data Architecture
Data Entity/Data Component Catalog
Data Entity/Business Function Matrix
Application/Data Matrix
Conceptual Data Diagram
Logical Data Diagram
Data Dissemination Diagram
Data Security Diagram
Data Migration Diagram
Data Lifecycle Diagram
35.6.5 Phase C: Application Architecture
Application Portfolio Catalog
Interface Catalog
Application/Organization Matrix
Role/Application Matrix
Application/Function Matrix
Application Interaction Matrix
Application Communication Diagram
Application and User Location Diagram
Application Use-Case Diagram
Enterprise Manageability Diagram
Process/Application Realization Diagram
Software Engineering Diagram
Application Migration Diagram
Software Distribution Diagram
35.6.6 Phase D: Technology Architecture
Technology Standards Catalog
Technology Portfolio Catalog
Application/Technology Matrix
Environments and Locations Diagram
Platform Decomposition Diagram
Processing Diagram
Networked Computing/Hardware Diagram
Communications Engineering Diagram
35.6.7 Phase E: Opportunities and Solutions
Project Context Diagram
Benefits Diagram
35.6.8 Requirements Management
Requirements Catalog
35.7 Recommended Architecture Views to be Developed
35.7.1 Developing a Business Architecture View
35.7.1.1 Stakeholders and Concerns
35.7.1.2 Developing the View
35.7.1.3 Key Issues
35.7.2 Developing an Enterprise Security View
35.7.2.1 Stakeholders and Concerns
35.7.2.2 Developing the View
35.7.2.3 Basic Concepts
Information Domains
Strict Isolation
Absolute Protection
35.7.2.4 Security Generic Architecture View
35.7.2.5 Security Services Allocation
Operating System Services
Network Services
System Security Management Services
35.7.3 Developing a Software Engineering View
35.7.3.1 Stakeholders and Concerns
Development Approach
Software Modularity and Re-Use
Portability
Migration and Interoperability
35.7.3.2 Key Issues
Data-Intensive versus Information-Intensive Software Systems
Achieving Interoperability
Software Tiers
Two-Tier
Three-Tier
Five-Tier
Some Uses of a Data Access Tier
One Possible Instantiation of a DAI
DAIs Enable Flexibility
Distribution
Infrastructure Bus
35.7.3.3 Conclusion
35.7.4 Developing a System Engineering View
35.7.4.1 Stakeholders and Concerns
35.7.4.2 Key Issues
Client/Server Model
Master/Slave and Hierarchic Models
Peer-to-Peer Model
Distributed Object Management Model
35.7.5 Developing a Communications Engineering View
35.7.5.1 Stakeholders and Concerns
35.7.5.2 Key Issues
Communications Infrastructure
Communications Models
The OSI Reference Model
Communications Framework
Allocation of Services to Components
35.7.6 Developing a Data Flow View
35.7.6.1 Stakeholders and Concerns
35.7.6.2 Developing the View
35.7.6.3 Key Issues
Database Management Systems
Database Models
Distributed DBMSs
Distributed Heterogeneous DBMSs
Data Dictionary/Directory Systems
Data Administration
Repository
Database Administration
Data Security
35.7.7 Developing an Enterprise Manageability View
35.7.7.1 Stakeholders and Concerns
35.7.7.2 Developing the View
35.7.7.3 Key Issues
35.7.8 Developing an Acquirer View
35.7.8.1 Stakeholders and Concerns
35.7.8.2 Developing the View
35.7.8.3 Key Issues
Footnotes
36. Architecture Deliverables
36.1 Introduction
36.2 Deliverable Descriptions
36.2.1 Architecture Building Blocks
36.2.2 Architecture Contract
Purpose
Content
36.2.3 Architecture Definition Document
Purpose
Content
36.2.4 Architecture Principles
Purpose
Content
36.2.5 Architecture Repository
Purpose
Content
36.2.6 Architecture Requirements Specification
Purpose
Content
36.2.7 Architecture Roadmap
Purpose
Content
36.2.8 Architecture Vision
Purpose
Content
36.2.9 Business Principles, Business Goals, and Business Drivers
Purpose
Content
36.2.10 Capability Assessment
Purpose
Content
36.2.11 Change Request
Purpose
Content
36.2.12 Communications Plan
Purpose
Content
36.2.13 Compliance Assessment
Purpose
Content
36.2.14 Implementation and Migration Plan
Purpose
Content
36.2.15 Implementation Governance Model
Purpose
Content
36.2.16 Organizational Model for Enterprise Architecture
Purpose
Content
36.2.17 Request for Architecture Work
Purpose
Content
36.2.18 Requirements Impact Assessment
Purpose
Content
36.2.19 Solution Building Blocks
36.2.20 Statement of Architecture Work
Purpose
Content
36.2.21 Tailored Architecture Framework
Purpose
Content
37. Building Blocks
37.1 Overview
37.2 Introduction to Building Blocks
37.2.1 Overview
37.2.2 Generic Characteristics
37.2.3 Architecture Building Blocks
37.2.3.1 Characteristics
37.2.3.2 Specification Content
37.2.4 Solution Building Blocks
37.2.4.1 Characteristics
37.2.4.2 Specification Content
37.3 Building Blocks and the ADM
37.3.1 Basic Principles
37.3.1.1 Building Blocks in Architecture Design
37.3.1.2 Building Block Design
37.3.2 Building Block Specification Process in the ADM
Footnotes
38. Introduction
38.1 Introduction
38.2 Structure of Part V
39. Enterprise Continuum
39.1 Overview
39.2 Enterprise Continuum and Architecture Re-Use
39.3 Constituents of the Enterprise Continuum
39.4 Enterprise Continuum in Detail
39.4.1 Architecture Continuum
Foundation Architecture
Common Systems Architectures
Industry Architectures
Organization-Specific Architectures
39.4.2 Solutions Continuum
Foundation Solutions
Common Systems Solutions
Industry Solutions
Organization-Specific Solutions
39.5 The Enterprise Continuum and the ADM
39.6 The Enterprise Continuum and Your Organization
39.6.1 Relationships
39.6.2 Your Enterprise
40. Architecture Partitioning
40.1 Overview
40.2 Applying Classification to Create Partitioned Architectures
40.2.1 Activities within the Preliminary Phase
40.3 Integration
41. Architecture Repository
41.1 Overview
41.2 Architecture Landscape
41.3 Reference Library
41.3.1 Overview
41.4 Standards Information Base
41.4.1 Overview
41.4.2 Types of Standard
41.4.3 Standards Lifecycle
41.4.4 Standards Classification within the Standards Information Base
41.5 Governance Log
41.5.1 Overview
41.5.2 Contents of the Governance Log
41.6 The Enterprise Repository
41.6.1 Requirements Repository
41.6.2 Solutions Repository
41.7 External Repositories
41.7.1 External Reference Models
41.7.2 External Standards
41.7.3 Architecture Board Approvals
42. Tools for Architecture Development
42.1 Overview
42.2 Issues in Tool Standardization
43. Foundation Architecture: Technical Reference Model
43.1 Concepts
43.1.1 Role of the TRM in the Foundation Architecture
43.1.2 TRM Components
43.1.3 Other TRMs
43.2 High-Level Breakdown
43.2.1 Overview
43.2.2 Portability and Interoperability
43.3 TRM in Detail
43.3.1 Introduction
43.3.2 TRM Entities and Interfaces
43.3.3 Application Software
43.3.3.1 Business Applications
43.3.3.2 Infrastructure Applications
43.3.4 Application Platform
43.3.4.1 Platform Concept
43.3.4.2 Extending the TRM
43.3.4.3 Interfaces Between Services
43.3.4.4 Future Developments
43.3.5 Communications Infrastructure
43.3.6 Application Platform Interface
43.3.7 Communications Infrastructure Interface
43.3.8 Qualities
43.4 Application Platform - Taxonomy
43.4.1 Basic Principles
43.4.2 Application Platform Service Categories
43.4.2.1 Object-Oriented Provision of Services
43.4.3 Application Platform Service Qualities
43.4.3.1 Principles
43.4.3.2 Taxonomy of Service Qualities
43.5 Detailed Platform Taxonomy
43.5.1 Data Interchange Services
43.5.2 Data Management Services
43.5.3 Graphics and Imaging Services
43.5.4 International Operation Services
43.5.5 Location and Directory Services
43.5.6 Network Services
43.5.7 Operating System Services
43.5.8 Software Engineering Services
43.5.9 Transaction Processing Services
43.5.10 User Interface Services
43.5.11 Security Services
43.5.12 System and Network Management Services
43.5.13 Object-Oriented Provision of Services
44. Integrated Information Infrastructure Reference Model
44.1 Basic Concepts
44.1.1 Background
44.1.2 Components of the Model
44.1.3 Relationship to Other parts of TOGAF
44.1.4 Key Business and Technical Drivers
44.1.4.1 Problem Space: The Need for Boundaryless Information Flow
44.1.4.2 Solution Space: The Need for Integrated Information Infrastructure
44.1.5 Status of the III-RM
44.2 High-Level View
44.2.1 Derivation of the III-RM from the TRM
44.2.2 High-Level III-RM Graphic
44.2.3 Components of the High-Level III-RM
44.3 Detailed Taxonomy
44.3.1 Detailed III-RM Graphic
44.3.2 Business Applications
44.3.2.1 Information Provider Applications
44.3.2.2 Brokerage Applications
44.3.2.3 Information Consumer Applications
44.3.3 Infrastructure Applications
44.3.3.1 Development Tools
Business Modeling Tools
Design Modeling Tools
Implementation and Construction Tools
Data Modeling Tools
Deployment Tools
Libraries
44.3.3.2 Management Utilities
Operations, Administration, and Management (OA&M) Utilities
Quality of Service Manager Utilities
Copy Management Utilities
Storage Management Utilities
44.3.4 Application Platform
44.3.4.1 Software Engineering Services
44.3.4.2 Security Services
44.3.4.3 Location and Directory Services
44.3.4.4 Human Interaction Services
44.3.4.5 Data Interchange Services
44.3.4.6 Data Management Services
44.3.4.7 Additional Operating System Services
44.3.5 Qualities
Footnotes
45. Introduction
45.1 Overview
45.2 Structure of Part VII
46. Establishing an Architecture Capability
46.1 Overview
46.2 Phase A: Architecture Vision
46.3 Phase B: Business Architecture
46.4 Phase C: Data Architecture
46.5 Phase C: Application Architecture
46.6 Phase D: Technology Architecture
46.7 Phase E: Opportunities & Solutions
46.8 Phase F: Migration Planning
46.9 Phase G: Implementation Governance
46.10 Phase H: Architecture Change Management
46.11 Requirements Management
47. Architecture Board
47.1 Role
47.2 Responsibilities
47.3 Setting Up the Architecture Board
47.3.1 Triggers
47.3.2 Size of the Board
47.3.3 Board Structure
47.4 Operation of the Architecture Board
47.4.1 General
47.4.2 Preparation
47.4.3 Agenda
Minutes of Previous Meeting
Requests for Change
Dispensations
Compliance Assessments
Dispute Resolution
Architecture Strategy and Direction Documentation
Actions Assigned
Contract Documentation Management
Any Other Business (AOB)
Schedule of Meetings
48. Architecture Compliance
48.1 Introduction
48.2 Terminology: The Meaning of Architecture Compliance
48.3 Architecture Compliance Reviews
48.3.1 Purpose
48.3.2 Timing
48.3.3 Governance and Personnel Scenarios
48.4 Architecture Compliance Review Process
48.4.1 Overview
48.4.2 Roles
48.4.3 Steps
48.5 Architecture Compliance Review Checklists
48.5.1 Hardware and Operating System Checklist
48.5.2 Software Services and Middleware Checklist
48.5.3 Applications Checklists
48.5.3.1 Infrastructure (Enterprise Productivity) Applications
48.5.3.2 Business Applications
48.5.3.3 Application Integration Approach
48.5.4 Information Management Checklists
48.5.4.1 Data Values
48.5.4.2 Data Definition
48.5.4.3 Security/Protection
48.5.4.4 Hosting, Data Types, and Sharing
48.5.4.5 Common Services
48.5.4.6 Access Method
48.5.5 Security Checklist
48.5.6 System Management Checklist
48.5.7 System Engineering/Overall Architecture Checklists
48.5.7.1 General
48.5.7.2 Processors/Servers/Clients
48.5.7.3 Client
48.5.7.4 Application Server
48.5.7.5 Data Server
48.5.7.6 COTS (where applicable)
48.5.8 System Engineering/Methods & Tools Checklist
48.6 Architecture Compliance Review Guidelines
48.6.1 Tailoring the Checklists
48.6.2 Conducting Architecture Compliance Reviews
49. Architecture Contracts
49.1 Role
49.2 Contents
49.2.1 Statement of Architecture Work
49.2.2 Contract between Architecture Design and Development Partners
49.2.3 Contract between Architecting Function and Business Users
49.3 Relationship to Architecture Governance
50. Architecture Governance
50.1 Introduction
50.1.1 Levels of Governance within the Enterprise
50.1.2 Nature of Governance
50.1.2.1 Governance: A Generic Perspective
50.1.2.2 Characteristics of Governance
50.1.3 Technology Governance
50.1.4 IT Governance
50.1.4.1 An IT Controls Framework - COBIT
50.1.5 Architecture Governance: Overview
50.1.5.1 Architecture Governance Characteristics
50.1.5.2 Architecture Governance as a Board-Level Responsibility
50.1.5.3 TOGAF and Architecture Governance
50.2 Architecture Governance Framework
50.2.1 Architecture Governance Framework - Conceptual Structure
50.2.1.1 Key Concepts
50.2.1.2 Key Architecture Governance Processes
Policy Management and Take-On
Compliance
Dispensation
Monitoring and Reporting
Business Control
Environment Management
50.2.2 Architecture Governance Framework - Organizational Structure
50.2.2.1 Overview
50.2.2.2 Key Areas
50.2.2.3 Operational Benefits
50.3 Architecture Governance in Practice
50.3.1 Architecture Governance - Key Success Factors
50.3.2 Elements of an Effective Architecture Governance Strategy
50.3.2.1 Architecture Governance and Corporate Politics
Footnotes
51. Architecture Maturity Models
51.1 Overview
51.2 Background
51.3 US DoC ACMM Framework
51.3.1 Overview
51.3.2 Elements of the ACMM
51.3.3 Example: Enterprise Architecture Process Maturity Levels
Level 0: None
Level 1: Initial
Level 2: Under Development
Level 3: Defined
Level 4: Managed
Level 5: Optimizing
51.4 Capability Maturity Models Integration (CMMI)
51.4.1 Introduction
51.4.2 SCAMPI Method
51.5 Conclusions
Footnotes
52. Architecture Skills Framework
52.1 Introduction
52.2 Need for an Enterprise Architecture Skills Framework
52.2.1 Definitional Rigor
52.2.2 Basis of an Internal Architecture Practice
52.3 Goals/Rationale
52.3.1 Certification of Enterprise Architects
52.3.2 Specific Benefits
52.4 Enterprise Architecture Role and Skill Categories
52.4.1 Overview
52.4.2 TOGAF Roles
52.4.3 Categories of Skills
52.4.4 Proficiency Levels
52.5 Enterprise Architecture Role and Skill Definitions
52.5.1 Generic Skills
52.5.2 Business Skills & Methods
52.5.3 Enterprise Architecture Skills
52.5.4 Program or Project Management Skills
52.5.5 IT General Knowledge Skills
52.5.6 Technical IT Skills
52.5.7 Legal Environment
52.6 Generic Role and Skills of the Enterprise Architect
52.6.1 Generic Role
52.6.2 Characterization in Terms of the Enterprise Continuum
52.6.3 Key Characteristics of an Enterprise Architect
52.6.3.1 Skills and Experience in Producing Designs
52.6.3.2 Extensive Technical Breadth, with Technical Depth in One or a Few Disciplines
52.6.3.3 Method-Driven Approach to Execution
52.6.3.4 Full Project Scope Experience
52.6.3.5 Leadership
52.6.3.6 Personal and Professional Skills
52.6.3.7 Skills and Experience in One or More Industries
52.7 Conclusions
A. Glossary of Supplementary Definitions
A.1 Access Control (AC)
A.2 Ada
A.3 Application Component
A.4 Application Software
A.5 Availability
A.6 Batch Processing
A.7 Business System
A.8 Catalog
A.9 Client
A.10 COBIT
A.11 Communications Network
A.12 Communications Node
A.13 Communications System
A.14 Composite Application
A.15 Configuration Management
A.16 Connectivity Service
A.17 Contract
A.18 Control
A.19 CxO
A.20 Data Dictionary
A.21 Data Element
A.22 Data Entity
A.23 Data Interchange Service
A.24 Data Management Service
A.25 Database
A.26 Database Management System
A.27 Directory Service
A.28 Distributed Database
A.29 Driver
A.30 End User
A.31 Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) System
A.32 Event
A.33 External Environment Interface (EEI)
A.34 FORTRAN
A.35 Functional Decomposition
A.36 Goal
A.37 Guideline
A.38 Hardware
A.39 Human Computer Interface (HCI)
A.40 Information Domain
A.41 Information System (IS)
A.42 Information System Service
A.43 Interaction
A.44 Interaction Model
A.45 Interface
A.46 ITIL
A.47 Key Performance Indicator (KPI)
A.48 Lifecycle
A.49 Location
A.50 Logical Application Component
A.51 Logical Data Component
A.52 Logical Technology Component
A.53 Managing Successful Programs (MSP)
A.54 Matrix
A.55 Measure
A.56 Metaview
A.57 Multimedia Service
A.58 Open Specifications
A.59 Open System
A.60 Operational Governance
A.61 Operating System Service
A.62 Packaged Services
A.63 Physical Application Component
A.64 Physical Data Component
A.65 Physical Technology Component
A.66 Portability
A.67 Portfolio
A.68 PRINCE2
A.69 Process
A.70 Product
A.71 Profile
A.72 Profiling
A.73 Program
A.74 Project
A.75 Risk Management
A.76 Scalability
A.77 Security
A.78 Server
A.79 Service
A.80 Service Quality
A.81 SMART
A.82 Supplier Management
A.83 System
A.84 System and Network Management Service
A.85 System Stakeholder
A.86 Technology Component
A.87 Time Period
A.88 Transaction
A.89 Transaction Sequence
A.90 Use-Case
A.91 User
A.92 User Interface Service
B. Abbreviations
INDEX

TOGAF es un marco - un método detallado y un conjunto de herramientas de apoyo - para el desarrollo de una arquitectura empresarial, desarrollado por los miembros de El Foro Open Group Architecture. TOGAF Versión 9.1 es una actualización de mantenimiento de TOGAF 9, dirigiéndose a los comentarios planteados desde la introducción de TOGAF 9 en 2009. Conserva las características principales y la estructura de TOGAF 9, preservando así la inversión existente en TOGAF, y agrega más detalle y aclaración a lo que es ya probado. Puede ser utilizado libremente por cualquier organización que desee desarrollar una arquitectura de la empresa para su uso dentro de esa organización (sujeto a las Condiciones de Uso). Este libro se divide en siete partes.

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